EIN Order Form Now on Delawareinc.com

By Paul Sponaugle Wednesday, July 6, 2011

Whether it’s changing the name of an entity or re-organizing an entity, changes like this often seem to raise the question, “Do I need to get a new EIN?” Ultimately, that decision will be made by the IRS, but as a rule of thumb, any time a business re-organizes it will need a new EIN (Federal Tax ID).  Examples of re-organization include:

  • Changing from a corporation to another entity, like an LLC or Limited Partnership, or vice versa
  • Incorporating in a new state, resulting in a new state charter
  • Merging corporations, resulting in a new corporation
  • Changing a sole proprietor to a partnership or other business entity like a corporation, LLC, etc
  • Changing a partnership to a sole proprietor or other business entity like a corporation, LLC, etc
  • Changes to a partnership, resulting in a new partnership (i.e. one partner out, a new partner in)
  • Changes in business ownership that result in the original EIN applicant no longer maintaining ownership of the company

Aside from re-organizing a business, most other changes typically do not require a new EIN.  Some examples of changes that do not require a new EIN are:

  • Changing the name of your business
  • Changing a location or adding a location
  • Electing to be taxed as an S corporation or electing, on Form 8832 Entity Classification Election, to change the way the entity is taxed
  • A partnership or corporation declares bankruptcy

These lists are not meant to cover all situations, but do cover a number of common changes we see every day here at Harvard Business Services, Inc.  If you still wonder whether or not you need a new EIN, check out this article www.IRS.gov entitled, “Do You Need a New EIN?”

You can fill out this order form if you'd like Harvard Business Services, Inc. to obtain a new EIN order form for your business. It's never been easier!

Disclaimer

THE AUTHOR OF THIS BLOG ARTICLE IS NOT A LAWYER AND HARVARD BUSINESS SERVICES, INC. IS NOT A LAW FIRM. THE ARTICLE ABOVE IS NOT INTENDED AS LEGAL ADVICE AND SHOULD NOT BE TAKEN AS LEGAL ADVICE. THIS SHORT ARTICLE IS STRICTLY TO MENTION SOME ASPECTS OF DELAWARE’S CORPORATION LAWS AND/OR LAWS RELATING TO OTHER FORMS OF ENTITIES WHICH YOU MAY NOT BE FAMILIAR WITH. WE RECOMMEND THAT YOU CONSULT WITH A LAWYER BEFORE FORMULATING A STRATEGY WHICH WILL BE SUITABLE FOR YOUR SPECIFIC CASE.

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